(Source: r0llcake, via faunaboy)

@2 hours ago with 17392 notes
#animation ref 
@3 hours ago with 826 notes
"My Dad has always said: ‘You don’t want to play a Bond girl. You want to play a villain.’

(Source: karengillanlover, via notsoplainbutinsanejane)

@3 hours ago with 8339 notes
#karen gillan #you perfect human being 

(Source: mitchvicious, via thefuuuucomics)

@3 hours ago with 21236 notes

"Three simple rules in life. 1. If you do not go after what you want, you’ll never have it. 2. If you do not ask, the answer will always be no. 3. If you do not step forward, you will always be in the same place."

(via wild-spirit)

(Source: purpleemoon, via burdge)

@1 day ago with 11561 notes
#animation ref 
@3 hours ago with 309523 notes

kateordie:

ed-sheeran:

Taylor Swift - Shake It Off

No YOU’VE already listened to this 8 times

(via snuggly-duckling)

@3 hours ago with 34575 note and 276573 play
#ive listened to this already #reblogging so i can listen to it later again huehue 
sketchcomplex:

things are different on this side of town

sketchcomplex:

things are different on this side of town

(via faunaboy)

@3 hours ago with 5859 notes
#animation ref 

ricflairsniece:

unexplained-events:

The Nutshell Studies of Unexplained Death

Frances Glessner Lee, a millionaire heiress, revolutionized the study of forensics and crime scene investigation. She believed that crimes could be solved by a detailed analysis of visual and material evidence.

She used newspaper reports, and interviews with policemen and morgue workers to create miniture crime scenes(which were extremely detailed) such as suicides, accidental deaths, accidents as homicides and homicide, potentially, as suicides. Of the twenty she made, eighteen have survived and of those eighteen, eleven show violent deaths of women. Everything from the wallpaper to the presence of alcohol and drugs was added to the miniture crime scenes.

This helped investigators train to identify crimes and clues found at crime scenes and left a big mark on the field as we know it today. They were also used in Harvard Associates in Police Science (HAPS) seminars. She called them nutshell cases, a name that was inspired by a detective who told her this:

As the investigator, you must bear in mind that there is a two-fold responsibility—to clear the innocent as well as expose the guilty. Seek only the facts—Find the truth in a Nutshell.

SOURCE

There is a documentary about this on Netflix called Of Dolls and Murder.

This is some real life Alfendi Layton shit

(via anodal)

@3 hours ago with 5089 notes
#Layton brothers mystery room 

katahane:

jesus christ

(via heijikudou)

@2 days ago with 52412 notes
#WHEN I SAY I LOVE SAINT YOUNG MEN #MY FRIENDS LOOK AT ME FUNNY LIKE #WHAT IS WRONG WITH YOU